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Posts tagged batgirl

Oct 17
ohheynana:

Here we go! 

ohheynana:

Here we go! 


Oct 13

(via daggerpen)


Oct 11

(via gothamboo)


Oct 9
torisora:

tinkered around with brush presets and drew a misfit-esque cass yeeaaa 

torisora:

tinkered around with brush presets and drew a misfit-esque cass yeeaaa 

(via empiristic)


thats-what-sidhe-said:

comicsalliance:

BATGIRL #35 REVIEW: MAKING OUT, DRESSING UP, AND DEFEATING THE FORCES OF MISOGYNY
By Juliet Kahn
Barbara Gordon is for girls. This truth has been obscured over the years, most notably in the Batman: The Killing Joke, in which the classic Batgirl was shot, sexually abused and paralyzed by the Joker and taken out of costume for decades. But just as Superman stands for unimpeachable hope and Batman for rigid justice, Batgirl stands for girls doing what the hell they want. From the moment she debuted as part of the classic BatmanTV show of the 1960s, this was clear: she was a librarian, she rode a motorcycle decorated with chiffon ruffles, and she did not give a damn that Batman wanted her to hang up the glittery puple cape and cowl. She was no sweet-tempered Kyptonian cousin, no kid sister, and no swooning girlfriend. As Mike Madrid detailed in The Supergirls: Fashion, Feminism, Fantasy, and the History of Comic Book Heroines, “Batgirl is a female Batman can actually regard as a brilliant peer and a partner in the war on crime, the same way he would a male.”
In her best adventures, this ember at the core of her character is stoked to a roaring flame—her time as Oracle, the fan-favorite super-hacker and enduringly powerful symbol for disabled persons in superhero comics; her portrayal as part of the Gotham Girls webseries and Batman: The Animated Series; and Scott Beatty & Chuck Dixon and Marcos Martin’s Batgirl: Year One come to mind. But these moments are brief, because as we all know, girls don’t read comics. Mostly, Barbara—the true Barbara, as all our favorite interpretations of these imprecise characters are the “true” ones—has lain in wait, a winking promise in the hands of a good-enough creative team. I’ve waited too. I’ve waited through mediocre art and ill-chosen storylines and a reboot I’m still not unequivocally behind. Today, as vibrantly portrayed by Cameron Stewart, Brenden Fletcher. Babs Tarr andMaris Wicks, she has arrived in DC’s Batgirl #35.
READ MORE

“Though I enjoyed Gail Simone’s take on Barbara, this Batgirl is the first time that I’ve felt the controversial loss of Oracle was justified.”

Imagine a world where there’s more than one woman in the Batfamily. Imagine keeping Barbara as Oracle and still having a young, hip Batgirl.

Imagine - and this is a tough concept, but bear with me - imagine more than one female superhero in Gotham City.

Was I supposed to be grateful that DC has finally noticed they have a female audience? Sorry, I’ll try harder next time.

thats-what-sidhe-said:

comicsalliance:

BATGIRL #35 REVIEW: MAKING OUT, DRESSING UP, AND DEFEATING THE FORCES OF MISOGYNY

By Juliet Kahn

Barbara Gordon is for girls. This truth has been obscured over the years, most notably in the Batman: The Killing Joke, in which the classic Batgirl was shot, sexually abused and paralyzed by the Joker and taken out of costume for decades. But just as Superman stands for unimpeachable hope and Batman for rigid justice, Batgirl stands for girls doing what the hell they want. From the moment she debuted as part of the classic BatmanTV show of the 1960s, this was clear: she was a librarian, she rode a motorcycle decorated with chiffon ruffles, and she did not give a damn that Batman wanted her to hang up the glittery puple cape and cowl. She was no sweet-tempered Kyptonian cousin, no kid sister, and no swooning girlfriend. As Mike Madrid detailed in The Supergirls: Fashion, Feminism, Fantasy, and the History of Comic Book Heroines, “Batgirl is a female Batman can actually regard as a brilliant peer and a partner in the war on crime, the same way he would a male.”

In her best adventures, this ember at the core of her character is stoked to a roaring flame—her time as Oracle, the fan-favorite super-hacker and enduringly powerful symbol for disabled persons in superhero comics; her portrayal as part of the Gotham Girls webseries and Batman: The Animated Series; and Scott Beatty & Chuck Dixon and Marcos Martin’s Batgirl: Year One come to mind. But these moments are brief, because as we all know, girls don’t read comics. Mostly, Barbara—the true Barbara, as all our favorite interpretations of these imprecise characters are the “true” ones—has lain in wait, a winking promise in the hands of a good-enough creative team. I’ve waited too. I’ve waited through mediocre art and ill-chosen storylines and a reboot I’m still not unequivocally behind. Today, as vibrantly portrayed by Cameron StewartBrenden FletcherBabs Tarr andMaris Wicks, she has arrived in DC’s Batgirl #35.

READ MORE

Though I enjoyed Gail Simone’s take on Barbara, this Batgirl is the first time that I’ve felt the controversial loss of Oracle was justified.”

Imagine a world where there’s more than one woman in the Batfamily. Imagine keeping Barbara as Oracle and still having a young, hip Batgirl.

Imagine - and this is a tough concept, but bear with me - imagine more than one female superhero in Gotham City.

Was I supposed to be grateful that DC has finally noticed they have a female audience? Sorry, I’ll try harder next time.


Oct 5
dcwomenofcolor:

₩ℴℂtober Fest : ⟨ BATGIRL LEGACY ⟩

Cassandra Cain


Nell Little


Nissa


Tiffany Fox

dcwomenofcolor:

₩ℴℂtober Fest : 〈 BATGIRL LEGACY 〉

Cassandra Cain

Nell Little

Nissa

Tiffany Fox


Oct 1
petervnguyen:

New Batgirl bestest friends for ever
for NYCC 2014
-peter
table Artist Alley K4
Add to your set of bestest buddies that hate but love each other. The other other red robins.

petervnguyen:

New Batgirl bestest friends for ever

for NYCC 2014

-peter

table Artist Alley K4

Add to your set of bestest buddies that hate but love each other. The other other red robins.

(via daggerpen)


Sep 24

namehart:

Batgirl - Stephanie Brown

namehart:

Batgirl - Stephanie Brown


dinahlance:

comics meme | 4/10 characters

"I’m almost fifty percent sure nothing could go wrong."


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